ELC did a 30-day challenge

Juggling with Katie

I think there are very few people who are successful in every aspect of their lives.

A lot of things take time and practice to perfect.

As we tell our students: consistency is key. If you’re learning a language, practising a sport or even trying to be the best parent you can possibly be. It takes work.

At the beginning of the 30-day challenge, I was highly motivated. I love drawing and I always wish I have more time to do it. As the days went on I found it more and more difficult to prioritise my own hobbies. My daughter began CP in September and is beginning to read so I’ve loved helping her do her homework and watching her progress. I also love my job and my students and working between home and Marseille has kept me active; which is important because I’m also pregnant and getting bigger, slower and less flexible every day!

Very often, I realised that it was the end of the day and I hadn’t picked up my pencil.

It’s not always easy but I haven’t given up yet. So, if you too are struggling to juggle everything, I completely understand. But keep going, we’re in it together!

The Challenge… thirty days later

One month ago, I enthusiastically threw myself into learning a new language. And for at least ten days, that enthusiasm made me push myself to learn as much as I could every day. I was very proud of myself, managing to crunch my way through fifty exercises a day, but then work and responsibilities slowed me down. I began to realise that what I tell my students must be true for me too: take it slowly, and don’t try to run before you can walk.

I realised that repetition, although quite boring, is actually very useful in helping to remember things, and that vocabulary does not simply enter your mind and stay forever – you have to work at it!

I understand that, as a language teacher, I have an advantage in understanding the processes and grammatical structures, but the mental gymnastics required to say things not only in different words but also in different ways can be exhausting.

Sometimes, in the past week, I have only managed five or ten minutes a day, but I believe that spending some time every day to maintain what has already been learned is extremely important. I’m happy to say that I feel my Spanish has improved a great deal, at least in terms of understanding. I fully intend to continue learning, because it has been such a pleasurable experience. And I’ve won myself more than four hundred crowns on the Duolingo platform!

All I need to do now is to actually speak the language with some real Spanish people!

Hasta la vista!

 

Regularity is key!

My challenge for September was born from a challenge that my 18-year-old daughter had set herself: be able to do the splits within 30 days. And of course, as I cannot resist a challenge myself, I joined her, safe in the knowledge that I had been able to do the splits when I was a young girl so there was no danger of me not achieving the same flexibility 40 years later.

 30 days later, I am probably a centimetre closer to the ground than I was at the beginning of September, but I am more determined than ever! My sister-in-law used to boast that her grandmother of 90 would do the split at parties to amuse the crowd, so I have decided that THIS is my new challenge!

 We always tell our lovely students that learning a language is like doing sport: regularity is key, but it is a long-term commitment. It is wonderful to observe the gains, but fluency is as easy to lose as a pert bottom if you don’t test it on a regular basis.

 So, watch this space. I haven’t given up yet!

 

 

Post-30-day challenge

Jugglers (jongleurs), that’s what we are. Work, tasks, errands, cooking, friends, family, sleep—every week we try to juggle those, attempting to (en essayant de) find time for all of them. Some people even like to play on hard mode (en mode difficile), adding children, volunteering (volontariat), and other activities to the list. And, like a juggler, the more balls we have in the air, the more likely we can’t find time to catch them all.

One thing we might forget to add to our list is exercise. ‘I don’t have the time,’ you might say, or ‘I’ll start next week.’ How about this one— ‘I used to be fit! But I hurt my back/knee/foot.’ I’m certainly guilty of (coupable de) saying one or all of these. There is an expression, however, that we tend to forget: ‘healthy body, healthy mind’ (un esprit sain dans un corps sain). If we believe that saying to be true, then we must consider the long-term (à long terme) health impact of our busy lives on our bodies, if our bodies are not capable. We look after (s’occuper de) the engines in our cars, so that we can continue to use them, but we don’t always do the same for ourselves.

How much exercise should we get each week? There are many different recommendations, but about 30 minutes per day for about 5 days a week is a common recommendation. Even if (même si) we might need to exercise for longer, 30 minutes is better than 0 minutes. It could be as easy as parking your car further away from your work and walking, or sometimes choosing to ride a bike instead of taking your car or scooter.

Last month for my 30-day challenge I committed to (s’engager à) going to the gym (salle de sport) at least 5 times a week. That was my commitment (engagement) to ‘healthy body, healthy mind’. I succeeded in doing this, going a total of 35 times during the month. Now my goal is to continue. Healthy body, healthy mind!